Wednesday, 27 February 2008

Europe 1100-1600 - How Wales Was Lost

Europe in 1600 A.D.

Note: Berwick is in Scotland

Europe in 1100 A.D.
Note: Oswestry is in Wales

13 comments:

Normal Mouth said...

I can't see Wales on either map.

alanindyfed said...

Well, look closely and you will see the two kingdoms of Gwynedd and Deheubarth, which constitute present-day Wales (Cymru). There are also other areas - Gwent and lands west of the Severn and Wye.

In the second map Wales has been devoured by England but nevertheless existed though no longer recognised.

Normal Mouth said...

I see Gwynedd and Deheubarth. I understand that the two kingdoms (with other areas) make up what we now understand Wales to be.

What I don't see is a Wales that was lost.

alanindyfed said...

Annexed and incorporated into England 1535 A.D., and the language designated for extirpation.
The French deported Breton families to the South of France in a similar move. Tartars were deported to Siberia. The list of atrocities begins at home.

Normal Mouth said...

Not according to the map.

alanindyfed said...

According to the 1600 A.D. map
showing the Kingdom of England only.

Normal Mouth said...

Not according to either map.

alanindyfed said...

You do love my blog NM.
Even though you are prone to making unwarranted criticisms!

Anonymous said...

As a matter of interest, what did the English call Gwynedd and Deheubarth following the extirpation of Welsh?

alanindyfed said...

They were unsuccessful - Welsh was not extirpated!

Anonymous said...

Nonetheless, what did the English call Gwynedd and Deheubarth.

I only asked.

penlan said...

I think Gwynedd was called Venedotia-I don't know whether that was its old Roman name.It never became a marcher lordship unlike Deheubarth which was parcelled out among the Norman freebooters.

Anonymous said...

Penlan.

Many thanks, I'm obliged.